Adding Life to Years 

Official Dentist

 

124 W. Main St., Union, MO 63084

(636) 583-2612
 

Dr. Edwards' Blog

So Why Are They Called "Wisdom" Teeth? -- Dec. 22, 2015

Here's a fun dental fact you might not have known.  Back in the 1600s, the third molars were referred to as "teeth of wisdom."  Then in the 1800s, they became known as simply "wisdom teeth."

The third molars generally appear much later than other teeth, usually somewhere between the ages of 17 and 25 when a person reaches adulthood.

Therefore, the person would be "wiser" than during childhood and adolescence when the other teeth erupt.

Science tends to support that theory.  Research shows the brain doesn't reach full maturity until the age of 25.  So our ancestors might now have been so far off the mark.

About 90% of the world's population has or will have a least one wisdom tooth become impacted.  And many times, that can only be fixed with oral surgery.  Another 10% of the population will be lucky enough to never have to deal with wisdom teeth. 

 

Third molars have been referred to as “teeth of wisdom” since the Seventeenth Century and simply “wisdom teeth” since the Nineteenth Century. The third molars generally appear much later than other teeth, usually between the ages of 17 and 25 when a person reaches adulthood. It is generally thought among linguists that they are called wisdom teeth because they appear so late, at an age when a person matures into adulthood and is “wiser” than when other teeth have erupted.

Lately, science has added some credence to the idea that the third molar does indeed erupt when a person is “wiser”. Recent research has shown the brain continues to grow and develop right on through adolescence: in fact, most researchers believe the brain does not reach full maturity until the age of 25. Perhaps, then, our ancestors weren't so far off the mark — that the eruption of “wisdom teeth” is a sign that the carefree days of childhood have given way to the responsibilities of adulthood.

    

- See more at: file:///Users/caroldennigmann/Downloads/blog-wisdom-teeth#sthash.OQGT01sX.dpuf

Third molars have been referred to as “teeth of wisdom” since the Seventeenth Century and simply “wisdom teeth” since the Nineteenth Century. The third molars generally appear much later than other teeth, usually between the ages of 17 and 25 when a person reaches adulthood. It is generally thought among linguists that they are called wisdom teeth because they appear so late, at an age when a person matures into adulthood and is “wiser” than when other teeth have erupted.

Lately, science has added some credence to the idea that the third molar does indeed erupt when a person is “wiser”. Recent research has shown the brain continues to grow and develop right on through adolescence: in fact, most researchers believe the brain does not reach full maturity until the age of 25. Perhaps, then, our ancestors weren't so far off the mark — that the eruption of “wisdom teeth” is a sign that the carefree days of childhood have given way to the responsibilities of adulthood.

    

- See more at: file:///Users/caroldennigmann/Downloads/blog-wisdom-teeth#sthash.OQGT01sX.dpuf

Home    |    Our Spirit of Caring    |    Why Choose Us?   |    Our Services    |    Meet Our Doctors  
 Dental Library    |    Initial Visit    |    Contact Us

© 2009 optimadentalgroup.     All Rights Reserved